Getting Started
Currently stable Api version on Moota is version (2.0)

Request

Any tool that is fluent in HTTP can communicate with the API simply by requesting the correct URI. Requests should be made using the HTTPS protocol so that traffic is encrypted. The interface responds to different methods depending on the action required.
Parameter
Description
GET
For simple retrieval of information about your account, Droplets, or environment, you should use the GET method. The information you request will be returned to you as a JSON object. The attributes defined by the JSON object can be used to form additional requests. Any request using the GET method is read-only and will not affect any of the objects you are querying.
POST
To create a new object, your request should specify the POST method. The POST request includes all of the attributes necessary to create a new object. When you wish to create a new object, send a POST request to the target endpoint.
PUT
To update the information about a resource in your account, the PUT method is available. Like the DELETE Method, the PUT method is idempotent. It sets the state of the target using the provided values, regardless of their current values. Requests using the PUT method do not need to check the current attributes of the object.
PATCH
Some resources support partial modification. In these cases, the PATCH method is available. Unlike PUT which generally requires a complete representation of a resource, a PATCH request is is a set of instructions on how to modify a resource updating only specific attributes.
DELETE
To destroy a resource and remove it from your account and environment, the DELETE method should be used. This will remove the specified object if it is found. If it is not found, the operation will return a response indicating that the object was not found. This idempotency means that you do not have to check for a resource's availability prior to issuing a delete command, the final state will be the same regardless of its existence.

HTTP Statuses

Along with the HTTP methods that the API responds to, it will also return standard HTTP statuses, including error codes.
In the event of a problem, the status will contain the error code, while the body of the response will usually contain additional information about the problem that was encountered.
In general, if the status returned is in the 200 range, it indicates that the request was fulfilled successfully and that no error was encountered.
Return codes in the 400 range typically indicate that there was an issue with the request that was sent. Among other things, this could mean that you did not authenticate correctly, that you are requesting an action that you do not have authorization for, that the object you are requesting does not exist, or that your request is malformed.
If you receive a status in the 500 range, this generally indicates a server-side problem. This means that we are having an issue on our end and cannot fulfill your request currently.
400 and 500 level error responses will include a JSON object in their body, including the following attributes:
Name
Type
Description
error
string
A error providing additional information about the error, including details to help resolve it when possible.
message
string
A message providing additional information about the error, including details to help resolve it when possible.

Example Error Response 500

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{
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"error": "Unauthenticated."
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}
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{
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"message": "Data not found"
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}
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